Momofuku Noodle Bar; 16.0

David Chang does everything right when it comes to the food at his original restaurant. Korean classics are turned into exquisite, destination worthy fare that is equally delicious as innovative. The service is good enough, while the food shines in the bare, laidback space.

Tim Ho Wan; 16.5

Be certain to expect long lines at this outpost of the Asian chain that does dim sum well, with a varied menu of Chinese dishes that feel authentic and taste delicious. The space can feel slightly too compact, and even disorderly at times, while the service is forgettable, making the food the ultimate highlight of the experience.

KazuNori; 18.5

Each hand roll is served individually at a long counter where you can choose between sets of three and six pieces. The rolls are best eaten right away, when the nori is still crisp and the rice is still warm to experience the best of textures, temperatures and flavors.

Lilia; 18.0

Pasta is in the foreground at this Missy Robbins owned restaurant that glorifies her passion for pasta. Behind the bare, laid back setting and the usually good service, there is just enough to make for the ultimate enjoyment of each pasta.

Cosme; 15.5

This restaurant from Enrique Olvera cracked the list of the World’s 50 Best this year, while serving the upscale Mexican cuisine. The dining room is bare and metallic, and the waiters can be spacey, however the food feels authentic and delicious.

Simon & The Whale; 14.0

Gabriel Stulman’s latest project takes place in the Freehand Hotel, where Chef Matt Griffin prepares a menu consisting of mostly seafood, with some meat and vegetables in the background. The actual food is mostly mediocre, especially the entrées, which suffer from expensive, small portions and a lack of standouts.

Philadelphia Special – Zahav, Vernick, Vedge

Michael Solomonov takes diners on a trip to Israel with his thoughtful and sophisticated food that still manages to feel relaxed at the same time. The service is down-to-earth and attentive, while the dishes just keep on coming out, with each new family-style course feeling like an experience of its own.

Estela; 19.5

This restaurant from Chef Ignacio Mattos balances laid back and lively vibes with a restaurant that makes every meal feel like a special occasion. The a la carte menu is beautifully compact, allowing each table to order most of the few dishes that are on the menu. The plates, which are best shared, arrive one by one, and are all simple, yet seriously thoughtful.

The Spotted Pig; 15.0

It’s not uncommon to find a multi-hour wait any night of the week at April Bloomfield’s flagship restaurant in the West Village. The pub style dining room is decorated with pigs and possesses an aged feel.

Prune; 17.5

Gabrielle Hamilton cooks a concise, constantly changing menu that includes familiar ingredients prepared in intriguing ways. The small and tightly crowded dining room might seem like a burden, but in the end, it somehow adds to the homely feel of the food.

Atla; 16.5

Chefs Enrique Olvera and Daniela Soto-Innes’ vision for an all-day, any-day restaurant comes in the form of Atla. There’s a focus on casual, café like fare that still feels exciting and inventive.

Roberta’s; 18.0

Arriving at the stark and isolated restaurant front might produce misgivings; as will the absurd wait times no matter the day or time. However, despite all of this, any misgivings will be immediately silenced at first bite of the pizzas, which singularly justify waiting hours for dinner.